General Manager & Director of Sales and Marketing

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General Manager & Director of Sales and Marketing

Open to all General Manager Director of Sales & Marketing, Operations, Finance, and "Excom" management committee of Hospitality Industry.

Location: World Wide
Members: 40
Latest Activity: May 4

LeVinze Hospitality

LeVinze is a hotel management that provides comprehensive services in property and asset management, hotel consultancy, manpower placement and training.  We are based in Asia, the heart of the world famous hospitality in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Philippines, as well as Middle East and Africa.

LeVinze, currently in need of (two) 2 Hotel General Manager, (two) 2 Director of Sales & Marketing, (two) 2 E-Commerce Officer & two (2) Financial Controller.  

Note: Only shortlisted applicants will be schedule for an interview.  To interested applicants, please email us your updated CV & current compensation package directly to dr.vinceaims@gmail.com. The company talent data base ensure high confidentiality. Please click the link below https://levinzehospitality.blogspot.com/ . Thank you & Good Luck!

Discussion Forum

Seven C’s Strategy of Effective Communication

Started by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD Feb 10, 2011. 0 Replies

Hi colleagues,Just to share to you some effective ways or process of communicating to our staff....Enjoy it! Thanks...VinceContinue

Why hotels rank worst for guests & employees data security & what to do about it?

Started by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD Jan 21, 2011. 0 Replies

The most common problem is that data is not secure; rather, it generally resides in applications and databases as unsecured, clear-text data in most cases … whether it’s payment card information or…Continue

Standard Operating Procedure for Hotels & It's vital role in the Industry

Started by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD Jan 17, 2011. 0 Replies

In the hotel industry where excellent, consistent service is a key factor in success, standard operating procedures, or SOPs, play an important role. A hotel standard operating procedure's purpose is…Continue

S.O.E. Depreciation Ratios!!

Started by Azzam Emam. Last reply by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD Oct 30, 2010. 3 Replies

Hi, is there any written standards of SOE depreciation peroid? i.e. china, glass, silver, linen, kitchen utensils?if there, i'll be more than happy to receive it on my email (…Continue

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Comment by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD on May 4, 2017 at 10:37

LeVinze Hospitality

LeVinze is a hotel management that provides comprehensive services in property and asset management, hotel consultancy, manpower placement and training.  We are based in Asia, the heart of the world famous hospitality in Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Philippines, as well as Middle East and Africa.

LeVinze, currently in need of (two) 2 Hotel General Manager, (two) 2 Director of Sales & Marketing, (two) 2 E-Commerce Officer & two (2) Financial Controller.  

Note: Only shortlisted applicants will be schedule for an interview.  To interested applicants, please email us your updated CV & current compensation package directly to dr.vinceaims@gmail.com. The company talent data base ensure high confidentiality. Please click the link below https://levinzehospitality.blogspot.com/ . Thank you & Good Luck!

Comment by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD on December 10, 2014 at 13:09

Dear Colleagues,

It's quite long time haven't hear from our members.  We are hoping everyone are doing well on their works & expertise.

Best Regards,

Comment by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD on January 17, 2013 at 14:50

Dear co-members of Director of Finance and Operation, if anyone of us has good news to post in our portal -please don't hesitate to advice us.  Our goals is to provide opportunity to our current & incoming member.

Best Regards,

Vince

Comment by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD on May 17, 2012 at 17:41

Dear Colleagues,

We have need of additional staff for the following;

  1. Executive Chefs
  2. Food & Beverage Manager
  3. Casino & Bar Manager
  4. Front Office Staff, and
  5. General Manager

Kindly send your updated CV to vicsantiago_a@yahoo.com 

Best Regards,

 

Dr. Vince

Comment by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD on March 11, 2012 at 16:25

Dear Colleaques,

How's everyone.

Regards to all.

Comment by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD on December 15, 2010 at 18:54

 

Hi Cristian,

 

Budgeting is simple, what I can advice you for the time being is you must form a  BUDGET COMMITTEE:  A comprehensive budget usually involves all segments of a business.  As a result, representatives from each unit are typically included throughout the process. 

The process is likely to be spearheaded by a budget committee consisting of senior level personnel.  Such individuals bring valuable insights about all aspects of sales, production, and other phases of operations.  Not only are these individuals ideally positioned to provide the best possible information relative to their respective units, they also need to be present to effectively advocate for the opportunities and resource needs within their unit. 

 

The budget committee's work is not necessarily complete once the budget document is prepared and approved.  A remaining responsibility for many committees is to continually monitor progress against the budget, and potentially recommend mid-course corrections.  The budget committee's decisions can greatly impact the fate of specific business units, in terms of resources made available as well as setting the benchmarks that will be used to assess performance.  As a result, members of the budget committee will generally take their task very seriously.

 

Then, construct the BUDGET per department of your hotel, such as; for Front Office operation, Food & Beverages, Administrative & General and so on.  The budget construction process will normally follow the organizational chart.  Each component of the entity will be involved in preparing budget information relative to its unit.  This information is successively compiled together as it is passed up through the organization until an overall budget plan is achieved.  But, beyond the data compilation, there is critical difference in how budgets are actually developed among different organizations.  Some entities follow a top-down, or mandated approach.  Others utilize a bottom-up, or participative philosophy.

 

Kindly revert to me if you have some questions.  GOOD LUCK & Regards!

 

 

Dr. Vince

Comment by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD on December 12, 2010 at 9:43

Hi Talat,

 

Nice to meet you in hospitality.plus:) Kindly keep me posted.

Thank you.

 

With Kind Regards,

 

Vince

 

Comment by Talat Mahmood Khan on December 11, 2010 at 20:50

-:To whom it may concern :-

I am a multi-skilled have experience in Hotel management and is  associated with hospitality for more than 22 years, mainly worked in Rooms division departments and preformed on the titles such as Executive Housekeeper, Manager Guest Relations, Manager Rooms Division, Corporate Sales Manager, Director of Houskeeping, and Manager of Operations (Assistant to GM).

 

I am well confident on behalf of my experience that will fulfill the job requirements in term of buildings upkeep, Staff training (Behavioral & skill) Customer care, Revenues, Maintenance and Safety & Security Market Positioning etc.

 

I am desperately looking for an opportunity to work in a organization with the chance of upward growth. 

 

I assure that will perform with zeal and exceed on the expectations of authorities set for this role. I have the determination to achieve and elevate the organizational vision.

best regards

Talat Mahmood Khan

Comment by Dr. Vince Santiago, PhD on October 30, 2010 at 7:00
Hi Azzam,

Items of property, plant, and equipment are included in a separate category on a classified balance sheet. Property, plant, and equipment typically follows the Long-term Investments section, and is oftentimes simply referred to as "PP&E." Items appropriately included in this section of the balance sheet are the physical assets deployed in the productive operation of the business, like land, buildings, and equipment. Note that idle facilities or land held for speculation may more appropriately be listed in some other category on the balance sheet (like long-term investments) since these items are not in productive use. Within the PP&E section, the custom is to list PP&E according to expected life -- meaning that land (with an indefinite life) comes first, followed by buildings, then equipment. For some businesses, the amount of PP&E can be substantial. This is the case for firms that have heavy manufacturing operations or significant real estate holdings. Other businesses, say those that are service or intellectual based, may actually have very little to show within this balance sheet category. At right is an example of how a typical PP&E section of the balance sheet might appear. In the alternative, some companies may relegate this level of detailed disclosure into a note accompanying the financial statements, and instead just report a single number for "property, plant, and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation" on the face of the balance sheet.

After the cost and service life of an asset are determined, it is time to move on to the choice of depreciation method. The depreciation method is simply the pattern by which the cost is allocated to each of the periods involved in the service life. You may be surprised to learn that there are many methods from which to choose. Four popular methods are: (1) straight-line, (2) units-of-output, (3) double-declining-balance, and (4) sum-of-the-years'-digits.


THE STRAIGHT-LINE METHOD: Under this simple and popular approach, the annual depreciation is calculated by dividing the depreciable base by the service life. Normally, we apply this method to our assets.

FRACTIONAL PERIOD DEPRECIATION: Assets may be acquired at other than the beginning of an accounting period, and depreciation must be calculated for a partial period.

THE UNITS-OF-OUTPUT METHOD: This technique involves calculations that are quite similar to the straight-line method, but it allocates the depreciable base over the units of output (e.g., machine hours) rather than years of use. It is logical to use this approach in those situations where the life is best measured by identifiable units of machine "consumption."

THE DOUBLE-DECLINING BALANCE METHOD

THE DOUBLE-DECLINING BALANCE METHOD (DDB): As one of several "accelerated depreciation" methods, DDB results in relatively large amounts of depreciation in early years of asset life and smaller amounts in later years. This method can be justified if the quality of service produced by an asset declines over time, or if repair and maintenance costs will rise over time to offset the declining depreciation amount. With this method, a fixed percentage of the straight-line rate (i.e., 200% or "double") is multiplied times the remaining book value of an asset (as of the beginning of a particular year) to determine depreciation for a particular year. As time passes, book value and annual depreciation decrease.

THE SUM-OF-THE-YEARS'-DIGITS METHOD

THE SUM-OF-THE-YEARS'-DIGITS METHOD: This approach was used in the graphic example at the beginning of this chapter, but without any calculation details. The calculations will undoubtedly be seen as a bit peculiar; I have no idea who first originated this approach or why.

Under the technique, depreciation for any given year is determined by multiplying the depreciable base by a fraction; the numerator is a digit relating to the year of use (e.g., the digit for an asset with a ten-year life would be 10 for the first year of use, 9 for the second, and so on), and the denominator is the sum-of-the-years' digits (e.g., 10 + 9 + 8 + . . . + 2 + 1 = 55). In our continuing illustration, the four-year lived asset would be depreciated as follows (bear in mind that 4 + 3 + 2 + 1 = 10):

FRACTIONAL PERIOD DEPRECIATION: With the sum-of-the-years'-digits method, fractional years require fairly intensive layering for every year (e.g., if a ten-year asset is acquired on July 1, 20X1, depreciation for 20X1 is the depreciable base times 10/55 times 6/12 (relating to six months of use); depreciation for 20X2 is the depreciable base times 10/55 times 6/12 (reflecting the last six months of the first layer), plus the depreciable base times 9/55 times 6/12 (reflecting the first six months of the next layer)).

Hoping those methods will be helpful to you Azzam for proper management of Hospitality & Resorts property management, not only for China Wares & utensils.

Keep up the good work!

With Kind Regards,

Vic
Comment by DENNIS MAGPANTAY on August 24, 2010 at 8:27
Thank you very much, Sir. I'll be forwarding my CV the soonest. Have a nice day and GOD bless...
 

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